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About me

Welcome! I am a Ph.D. candidate in Political Science at Stanford University. I research how states shape their ethnic demography from a comparative-historical perspective using quantitative methods. My dissertation explores the role that mass resettlement and the forced migration of minorities plays in state building and the construction of political order.  I theorize the conditions under which states seek to engage in demographic engineering and when this can both contribute to and undermine longer-term state building projects.  My work combines an attention to causal inference using historical demographic data with extensive archival research in China, Rwanda, and Ireland. 

My other research interests include the comparative construction of racial boundaries in the Americas and the effects of different forms of colonial rule on political attitudes. 

I am a Stanford Interdisciplinary Graduate fellow,  a Stanford Center on International Conflict and Negotiation (SCICN) fellow, and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Stanford Center in Peking University (SCPKU). My research has been supported by the Marjorie Deane Foundation, the Europe Center, the Stanford Center on Global Poverty and Development, and the Freeman Spogli Institute. 

Before coming to Stanford, I received a BA Philosophy, Politics, and Economics from the University of Oxford and an M.Phil in Economics from the University of Cambridge.